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The Role of Local Coordinators in the D&D Adventurers League

The D&D Adventurers League is administered by a rapidly growing network of people around the world. This article takes a look at the people you are most likely to find sitting across from you at the game table – the local coordinators. Sometimes called “LCs,” these individuals are the local face of the D&D Adventurers League. But who are they, and what do they do?

Who Are Local Coordinators?

Local coordinators are dedicated players and Dungeon Masters who have volunteered about two hours of their time each week to support the D&D Adventurers League. They are appointed by the D&D Adventurers League’s regional coordinators to help administer and communicate with part of a region. Local coordinators are responsible for areas as large as an entire state or as small as a part of city, depending on the D&D Adventurers League’s needs.

You can find out whether there is a local coordinator for your area, who it is and how to contact him or her by checking the administration wiki page. In areas where there is no local coordinator, the regional coordinator acts as the local coordinator.

What Do Local Coordinators Do?

Local coordinators support DMs, players, organizers, and store owners through social media contact and through in-person contact in stores and at conventions.

Social Media

Local coordinators help maintain the D&D Adventurers League’s social media presence. They answer questions and discuss the League on its websites. They also keep the League’s wiki up to date.

In addition, many local coordinators maintain websites for their local areas. You can use those sites, as well as the campaign’s global and regional sites, to find games, to ask questions about the D&D Adventurers League, and to discuss League games. Stores and conventions use the websites to advertise their League events and to find DMs. The campaign’s local and regional websites are listed on the League’s administration page.

Store Support

Local coordinators support play in game stores. They are not required to organize in-store games, but many do. Your local organizer helps players and DMs in your area find stores where they can play and run games and helsp store owners and organizers find players and DMs. Moreover, if you’re interested in getting the League going in a store, you’re local organizer can help you do it!

Local coordinators reach out to all stores in their areas to offer assistance and meet store owners, organizers, players, and DMs. They make in-person visits to stores that are close to where they live and work, and they contact stores that are farther out by calling or emailing them or through social media.

Convention Support

Local coordinators also support play at conventions. Although local coordinators are not required to organize conventions, many do. Even those who do not can offer all manner of convention support. If you are a convention organizer, your local coordinator can help you find someone to organize League games at the convention, find stores to sponsor those games (obtaining magic item certificates and DCI cards), recruit DMs, advertise the convention, get your convention on the campaign convention map, prepare flyers about local play opportunities to distribute to attendees, and apply for the campaign’s special convention support programs (e.g., inviting special guests, obtaining premiere adventures and regional preview adventures, and hosting the magic item trading post).

Supporting Players, DMs, Organizers, and Store Owners

Whether it is in-person at a store or convention or remotely via social media or a phone call, it is the local coordinator’s job to gather feedback, answer questions about the D&D Adventurers League, and inform you about League events in your area. Feel free to reach out to your local coordinator, either in-person at stores and conventions, on campaign social media, or via email, to say hello to and talk to him or her about the League and how it’s doing in your area. Local coordinators are there to support you, and they are excellent source of information about the League and local play opportunities!

Southern California Local and Regional Coordinators

Southern California Local and Regional Coordinators

Playing and DMing

Local coordinators are not just expected to do the administrative and communications work above. They are also expected to play and run D&D Adventurers League games. Local coordinators are enthusiastic D&D players just like you. Some of them playtest the League’s adventures before they are released and may invite you to help them do so. Others help organize DM previews of new adventures for local Dungeon Masters. Since local organizers play and DM, they can be good people to turn to when you have questions about the game. Some even run DM training programs.

Local Coordinators Do Not Make the Rules and Aren’t the Police

Although local coordinators do quite a bit, there are some things that they are not permitted to do.

Local coordinators don’t make the campaign’s rules. They are subject to the rules in the Player’s Guide and the Player’s Handbook, just like you. They can’t break or bend the rules for you, and they can’t get you permission to break or bend them yourself.

Furthermore, local coordinators are not the League police. If they notice a problem, they will certainly try to help you by pointing it out and explaining how you can correct it, if you would like. If you have a dispute or a complaint or problem, feel free to ask your local coordinator for advice. He or she may know the applicable rule or be able to help you resolve the issue. If the local coordinator can’t do that, he or she can pass the issue on to the League or show you how to contact the League or Wizards yourself.

How Do I Become a Local Coordinator?

The campaign is growing quickly and needs more local coordinators. If serving as a local coordinator sounds like something you want to do, contact your regional coordinator to ask whether your can help!

Much like being a DM or local organizer, the rewards for being a local coordinator are intangible. Although local coordinators may get some special perks in the future, the real reward they get is the thanks of the players, DMs, and organizers they serve!

Art Severance

Art started playing D&D over 30 years ago after seeing other kids playing it on a bus on the way back from summer camp. Usually the DM, he's played and run games from his parents' kitchen table, friends' dorm rooms, East German apartments, Austrian gardens, conventions in many corners of the U.S. from Florida to Nevada, a hotel room in Bahrain, barracks, and a guided missile frigate. He's responsible for two LG adventures and one LFR adventure.

You can usually find him on Thursday nights doing what he loves most, playing D&D in his home office in a Los Angeles suburb with his husband Al, their dogs Wednesday and Luigi, and several close friends.
Art Severance

Author: Art Severance

Art started out as an English as a foreign language teacher, became an radio and radar repairman in the U.S. Navy, and then became a maritime and transportation lawyer. Those are his day jobs, his true passion is playing roleplaying games, especially D&D. He started playing D&D over 30 years ago after seeing other kids playing it on a bus on the way back from summer camp. Usually the DM, he's played and run games from his parents' kitchen table, friends' dorm rooms, East German apartments, Austrian gardens, conventions in many corners of the U.S. from Florida to Nevada, a hotel room in Bahrain, barracks, and a guided missile frigate. He's responsible for two LG adventures and one LFR adventure. You can usually find him on Thursday nights doing what he loves most, playing D&D in his home office in a Los Angeles suburb with his husband Al, their dogs Wednesday and Luigi, and several close friends.

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3 Comments

  1. How do I report abuse of power/not doing job properly?

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